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nurturing

Hibernating ’til 2015

By December 17, 2014 feeding ourselves, living a joyful life, nurturing, personal growth, pleasure, practice, slowing down

Hey guys. It’s been awhile since my last post. Maybe I will share what’s been going on after the first of the year. As with everything around me, I have been going through lots of changes. What a world we are living in! For a while, I will be taking some time to focus on self and be attentive to my own world. I will share at some point. I am not sure when and how that will evolve. I promise to keep you posted.

Cheers to each and everyone of you that have been keeping up with my site. It has been and will continue to be an expression of love. I have been so grateful for the interest and appreciation some of you have shared with me. I wish you all a wonderful holiday. I look forward to re-connecting with you in the new year.

So much love from way deep in my heart,

Shelly

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Taking Care of Your Veggies and Yourself

By October 19, 2014 Fall, greens, nurturing, practice, self care, taking care of veggies

Saturday I went to the farmers’ market. I was hoping to find a variety of autumn vegetables, and I certainly got what I had hoped for. The tables were loaded with lots of root vegetables: carrots, beets, kohlrabi, breakfast radishes, daikon radishes, and my personal favorite – Japanese salad (or hakeuri) turnips. There was quite the bounty of greens as well. It was a greens lover’s dream come true – a wide variety of lettuces, lacinato kale, red Russian kale, collards, escarole, tatsoi, mustard greens, cabbages, spinach and arugula.

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I have a “thing” for the roots, radishes, kale, and other hearty greens that can be found at the farmers’ market this time of year. The quality of the greens you will find at the market most often surpasses the produce you can buy at grocery stores.

Your greens will have a much longer shelf life when you buy what is locally grown. The less “travel time” there is from farm to market, the greater the amount of enzymes and nutrients the food will retain. And the healthier it is for our bodies.

Here’s a tip for keeping your root vegetables and greens livelier longer. I learned this technique while working in the produce department of a little neighborhood gem: The Turnip Truck natural market. Most larger grocers also use this method to keep their produce livelier and looking good for their customers.

The process is called hydrating. You are basically giving your vegetables a good drink of water. It’s amazing what this does for them. Let’s begin with the roots – if your root vegetables get soft, simply put them in a sink or bowl of lukewarm water. Allow them to soak for at least 30 minutes or until you feel them get firmer to your touch. Then you can drain the water off and either use the vegetables immediately for a recipe or put them back into the crisper in your refrigerator. If you buy a lot of carrots (or other roots) at once, but don’t use them that often, you can repeat this hydrating process as many times as you like.

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For the greens and lettuces, fill the sink or a large bowl about 2/3 full of lukewarm water. Next, trim the very bottom stem off of the lettuce head with a paring knife. If you have a bunch of greens like kale or collards, trim the stems off by ¼ inch. Immerse the lettuce or greens in the water. If you plan to use the greens right away, you can make the water a little colder. This will make a lettuce like romaine a little crisper right before eating it in a salad. Make sure not to put the vegetables into extremely cold water, because this shocks the plant. Soaking the lettuce or greens for at least 30 minutes or up to an hour and a half will liven them up really nicely.

When you take the lettuce or greens out of the water, you can simply shake off the excess water and return them to your fridge, or put them into your favorite salad recipe. If I am going to put lettuce or greens back into the fridge, I wrap paper towels around them to absorb some of the excess water and to keep my other veggies dry.

The hydrating process can help extend the life of your veggies and give them a good cleaning at the same time! In addition to the roots and greens, you can hydrate green onions, potatoes, fennel, and celery. However, I do not recommend this process for squashes, cucumbers, tomatoes, peppers, beans, peas, or eggplants.

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Enjoy the fall harvest! If you haven’t tried it yet, check out the farmers’ market bounty. You might be surprised how much you like it!

Lesson: The energy and care that we put into our lives is what we get in return. Taking time to care for our veggies and ourselves gives a beautiful return on our investments. What are you going to do to care for yourself this week? 

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A Beautiful Equation – The Melding of Skill and Love

By October 13, 2014 creativity, Durham, Fall, feeding ourselves, living a joyful life, nurturing, personal growth, pleasure, practice, self care, slowing down, Travel

Wow! Life has been busy and full of adventure. How about for you guys?

I had a wonderful week at the beach with friends mid-September. I took naps. I read fiction. I danced. I fished. I allowed myself to lose track of time. I nurtured myself and friendships with meaningful people in my life. I enjoyed the sun, the sand, and the water.

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That time re-ignited my intention to only put my energy into avenues and projects that feed my soul. I came back from that trip with a new sense of what I am going to be doing next. I will keep you posted on these adventures.

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I returned from vacation with my feet hitting the ground and running. I participated in and planned two different dinners for an annual fundraiser for Durham Central Park called Meals from the Market. I played a more of a hands-on role at a dinner at the historic Kress Building in downtown Durham with hosts Amanda Smith, Marybeth Dugan, and Kenny Dalsheimer. We could not have imagined a more picture-perfect evening!

These guests are enjoying a glass of Friulano, one of my favorite Italian white wines.

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I had the pleasure of working with a close friend and talented chef, Amanda Orser (pictured below on the right). This was mine and Amanda’s first public expression of melding our passions  and skill as a team. We have enjoyed each other’s company in the kitchen for as long as we have known each other.

We plan to facilitate many meals for others in the near future. If you know anyone need of a party, we are your gals. Amanda does the savory cooking, and I enjoy doing the wine pairing and making desserts. I was thrilled to have some of my Pizzeria Toro colleagues, including the lovely Nicky Owens (pictured below on the left), assist in making our service seamless from beginning to end.

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From fundraising to family- I just returned from a long weekend in San Antonio, Texas. I flew out to visit my family. I have a new niece, Rosalie, who just turned six weeks old. I went give her a loving welcome to this world and share some quality time with the rest of my family.

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I enjoyed time in the kitchen with my niece, Selena. We roasted okra that we found at the Pearl Farmer’s Market in downtown San Antonio.

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My mom flew back to North Carolina with me. She will be staying with me for a few weeks. Over this last weekend, we enjoyed a nice balance of cooking, connecting, and relaxing. I am looking forward to spending some time in the kitchen with her. She likes to bake as much as I do. I see some apple pie in our future. It is apple season here in North Carolina. Tonight I made sorghum glazed apples for dinner. They were the epitome of seasonal fare!

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I have another dinner event coming up this week. I am going to make some sorghum and cinnamon ice cream to serve with a pumpkin shortcake. I am excited and nervous to pull off a dessert that I have never made before. What always works in these situations is trusting my instincts and experience. It always turns out great! I was baking long before I could drive a car. I see an opportunity to share a recipe in the future.

With as full as my plate had been over the last month, I am as content with my life as I have ever been. I am putting my energy into projects that I truly enjoy. I am moving into the space of work becoming play. Who wants more of that? All hands raised, please!

Lesson: I am continuing to focus on my goal of only putting my energy into what feeds me – keeping in mind that I want to nurture the expansion of my talents and gifts. I am stretching myself all along the way. Isn’t that what this journey is about? What are you doing to feed yourself these days, even if it’s one little thing (that really is a big thing)?

 

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A Short and Sweet Reminder of How Important You Are

By August 24, 2014 feeding ourselves, getting out of our comfort zone, living a joyful life, nurturing, personal growth, practice, self care, slowing down

I could give you a post about a recent trip, making refreshing beverages for hot summer days, or how to preserve the last of summer vegetables.

Instead, I am keeping this post short, sweet, and to the point.

Who knew I was capable of that?

I am sending a loving nudge and a reminder to you of how important you are.

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Self care and nurturing are expressions of loving ourselves.

Learning to love ourselves is the most important work that we will do in our lives.

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Lesson: We are worthy of being a priority in our own lives. I know that the world is busy. There is a lot going on right now -inside and outside of us.

What can you do to treat yourself extra special this week?

How can you plant some seeds to keep you in the forefront of importance in your life? 

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Tomato-Fest Salsa

By August 11, 2014 building relationships with others, feeding ourselves, nurturing, pleasure, slowing down, summer, summer veggies

I spent all of last weekend at a cozy home in the woods with 70 pounds of tomatoes and a good friend. We made fresh tomato juice, canned tomatoes, made salsa, and had an all-around grand time together.

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I called this endeavor Tomato-fest. I posted many photos on Facebook and Instagram. I had people contact me to ask for recipes.

This has been a good year for tomatoes. I think that many folks with gardens this year have tomatoes coming out of their ears.  Here’s one of the recipes that I made during tomato-fest. Enjoy!

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Tomato-fest Garden Salsa

You can make this recipe for immediate enjoyment or you can process your jars of salsa in a water bath canner to preserve it. I have done both. This year I wanted to preserve this salsa so that I will have jars of garden fresh flavors around into the winter months. I prepared a batch 3x’s this recipe. If you have a large quantity of tomatoes, you can multiply this recipe easily. You could use any kind of tomatoes that you like. I had an abundance of roma’s.

Equipment you will need:

1 large mixing bowl

A cutting board

A sharp knife

Food processor

A large baking sheet

Aluminum foil or silpat non-stick baking mat

Ingredients for 2 quarts of salsa:

4 lbs of roma tomatoes (you can use any tomatoes that you have in abundance)

1 medium red onion

juice of 4 limes

1 bunch of cilantro

2 roasted Serrano peppers

1 fresh jalapeño

1 tablespoon of sea salt, plus more to taste

1/2 tablespoon of black pepper, plus more to taste

1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil

Pre-heat your oven to 400 degrees. Line a large baking sheet with a silpat baking sheet or aluminum foil.

Core the tomatoes. Cut the tomatoes in half and place them in a large bowl. Once you have all of your tomatoes halved and cored, toss the tomatoes with 1 tablespoon of sea salt and 1/2 tablespoon of black pepper. Allow the tomatoes to macerate with the salt and pepper for at least 5 minutes. Add the 1/4 cup of olive oil to the tomatoes. Toss the tomatoes with the olive oil until the tomatoes are lightly covered with the olive oil.

Place the tomatoes on your lined baking sheets, skin side down. Pour any juice from the tomatoes onto the baking sheet. Roast the tomatoes in the over for 40 minutes. They should just be showing some charred color when you take them out.

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While the tomatoes are roasting: Peel a red onion and cut it in half and set aside. Pick the leaves from the bunch of cilantro and set aside. Juice the limes using a citrus juicer or by cutting them in half and squeezing the juice by hand. Set the lime juice aside.

imageFor the Serrano peppers: You could roast them in the over with the tomatoes. If you have a gas stove, you can roast them directly on the fire for a more full flavor. Either way works fine. If you go for the charring directly on the flame, you will have to place them an ice bath after you char them on the stove-top. Once the peppers are cooled, peel the outer layer of the skin off of the peppers. Your peppers are now ready to use. I processed the peppers with the seeds and all.

imageOnce you remove the tomatoes from the oven, pour them along with the juices to a large mixing bowl to cool.

Let the tomatoes cool for 20 minutes or until you can handle them easily. Once they have cooled, you will process the tomatoes in batches in the food processor. I pulsed them until just slightly chunky. I wanted to make sure that the salsa would be chunky enough to stay on a tortilla chip. This is definitely a measure of preference. How chunky or thin do you like your salsa?

imageOnce you have processed all of the tomatoes in the food processor, put them back into a large mixing bowl.

Place the onion in the bowl of the food processor and pulse until finely chopped. Transfer the onion into the bowl with the tomatoes. Place the cilantro in the bowl of the food processor and add 1/2 cup of the lime juice. Pulse until the cilantro is finely chopped. Transfer the chopped cilantro into the bowl with the tomatoes.

imageAdd the peppers into the bowl of the food processor. Pulse them until finely chopped. Transfer the peppers into your bowl with the tomatoes.

Mix all of your added ingredients into the tomatoes. This will be when you will begin tasting for your preference. Keep in mind to add a little at a time. You can always keep adding. You cannot remove salt once you add it in.

imageYou can add more salt, pepper, lime juice, or even extra chiles to your salsa depending on your personal taste and preference.

I kept my salsa very basic. When I open one of the jars, I can always add more chiles to make it spicier if I want.

imageThis recipe will produce 2 quarts of salsa. If you will eat it quickly, refrigerate immediately. It will keep for a couple weeks.

I processed my salsa in a canner, so it will keep for several months. I placed the closed jars in a canning pot for 10 minutes. My goal in deciding to only process in the canner for 10 minute was to maintain the fresh taste of the cilantro and lime juice.

Lesson: With the busy lives that we lead, it can be challenging to make room in our schedules for concentrated time spent with our friends. Thankfully one of my best friends and I really enjoy being in the kitchen together. We rolled in a productive canning project into spending quality time together. We laughed, we danced, we sang, we ate well, and we worked until we could work no more for two days. The outcome was 30 quarts of preserved tomato goodness and an appreciation of the time that I had with my dear friend. Our tomato fest fed my heart and soul and nurtured our friendship. What creative ways do you carve out time for people in your life that is nurturing to self and the friendship?

 

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My o ya Experience

By July 21, 2014 attention to detail, creativity, feeding ourselves, getting out of our comfort zone, living a joyful life, nurturing, personal growth, pleasure, practice, self care, so much to learn, Travel

First, I want to extend my apologies to anyone who was looking for my post from Loving Food and Life in their inbox this last Monday. I unexpectedly did not have Internet access that was strong enough to handle posting to my site. I decided to chill out about it. Unexpected things happen. I was on a magnificent island at the time. What else was I to do?

I have at least 20 tales to tell you about the last month of my life. I have been making some leaps. I have been having a blast. I have been on vacation. I have been laughing or crying tears of joy depending on the moment. I have been appreciating these human-ly emotions that I have been feeling.

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This post is about exhibiting one of the finest meals of my life (so far). What lands it on the list of the finest? For one, I decided to take a leap and go explore the city of Boston by myself. This meal was a magical benefit of my decision to take this trip. There was no way that I could return to Boston (my 2nd visit there) without a meal at o ya. To make it even more special, my friend and past colleague from the days of working at the Magnolia Grill, Maggie Warren now lives in Boston and works as a server at o ya. She wanted to wait on me, and I was thrilled to have her share a dining experience with me.

It might be redundant for me to say this, but I dig deep into the beauty of a meal. By the time I left o ya, my eyes were filled with tears of joy. I was full of gratitude to all of the people who participated in running this restaurant. Each one contributed to making my experience grand. I was appreciative of how thoughtful Maggie chose each course for me with a perfect sake pairing to match. I almost felt like I had been transported to another world. Then I became deeply in touch with my own creation of this experience. As the tears uncontrollably fell down my cheeks, I realized how it felt to be responsible for all of this.

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I went to o ya early on a Friday night. When I made my reservation, I asked to be seated close to the “pass” at the chef counter where I could see the food coming out. I went in feeling thrilled to be there again. This was my 2nd time dining at o ya. My anticipation of many exquisite bites was bubbling over.

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I sat at the chef’s counter thrilled to have Maggie as a dining companion, while I would be the only one eating. I told Maggie to feed me whatever she wanted. I told her that I would let her know when I needed to slow down. She brought me a beautiful flute of champagne to get things started.

Here’s what happened next: (I have posted the dish and then the picture)

Kumamoto Oyster watermelon pearls, cucumber mignonette

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Hamachi spicy banana pepper mousse

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Salmon unfiltered wheat soy moromi

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Santa Barbara Sea Urchin and Russian Ossetra Caviar

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Karikari Crispy Sesame Chicken Skin yuzu-honey pickled ginger, schmaltz powder

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Artic Char yuzu cured, sesame brittle, cumin aioli, cilantro

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Fried Kumamoto Oyster yuzu kosho aioli, squid ink bubbles

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Wild Bluefin Maguro soy braised garlic, micro greens

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Kyoto Style Wild Morel Mushrooms garlic, soy

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Line Caught Ishidai Usuzukuri spotted knife jaw, ponzu, green onion, spicy daikon

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Scottish Salmon Belly cilantro, ginger, hot sesame oil drizzle

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Hamachi viet mignonette, thai basil, shallot

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Bluefin Toro Tartare ginger kimchee jus

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Chilled Maine Lobster Salad avocado, creamy yuzu dressing, micro greens, cucumber gelee

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Tea Brined Fried Pork Ribs hot sesame oil, honey, scallions

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Grilled Chanterelle and Shiitake Mushroom Sashimi rosemary garlic oil, sesame froth, soy

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Kushiyaki of Kobe roasted onion, yuzu kosho, maple soy sauce

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Foie Gras Miso Spoon tempura bits, preserved yuzu

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Chilled Daikon Dumpling miso nut “cheese,” homemade kimchee, wakame, spicy pine nut mayo

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Yuzu Curd almond, blackberry-jasmine, meringue and Aged Sake Gelato miso-hazelnut caramel, vanilla cremeaux, financier

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I am not a restaurant critic. You can find all sorts of amazing reviews of o ya here from critics all over the country.  Please check out o ya for yourself if you’re curious in learning more about them. If you’re in Boston, make a reservation.  It truly is a “don’t miss!” They pay attention to every detail you can imagine. When you are there, you will see beauty at every turn. I definitely had moments when I thought I could’t bear to lose the taste that I had just experienced. In his review of o ya in the New York Times in 2008, Frank Bruni said that he ordered a 2nd piece of one dish right after the first. There was no way he was leaving o ya with the memory of just one.

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Lesson: I have been in the process of stepping into a new way of living. To give you contrast, I spent many years often expecting the worse or not having much expectation because I was afraid of being disappointed. I am learning to trust that life is joyful and full of beautiful experiences. This dinner at o ya was indeed aesthetically beautiful. The presentation of the food was an exhibit of art. The smells and tastes of each plate were inviting and expansive. This dinner was an exhibition of how beautiful life can be. It served as a reminder that I am an artist to the depths of my soul. I have the ability and the power to create anything that I want in this life.

I am going to continue to practice this art of creating. It is bringing so much joy into my life. It’s not that fleeting kind of feeling that comes and goes. It is hanging around. It is flowing through me and into each encounter and experience that I create. It is hard to put into words what this is like. It is my wish that you can feel what I am saying.

What steps are you taking to make room for more joy in your life?

 

 

 

 

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Dear Summer, thank you for the pleasures you bring!

By June 30, 2014 feeding ourselves, getting out of our comfort zone, nurturing, pleasure, practice, self care, simplicity, slowing down, summer veggies

Here’s a visual expression of a few things that are bringing pleasure to me right now. IMG_0169The anticipation of tomato season is beyond words. I savor every juicy bite!

IMG_0288There are few pleasures greater than homemade vanilla bean ice cream.

IMG_0321I wake to see blossoming all around me! 

IMG_0335Fruits of summer at the Durham Farmers’ Market.

IMG_0284Grilling and chilling.

IMG_0388More blossoming. Sungold tomatoes on their way.

IMG_0407Okra flower.

IMG_0417My garden mentor, Peter.

IMG_0451Look at those beautiful bean plants.

IMG_0445Cantaloupe, I can eat all day every day.

IMG_0476Summer supper with friends. My first corn of the season, elote` asada.

Lesson: Summer brings simple pleasures. I am taking the time to appreciate all of the simple things in my life right now: the juicy bite of a tomato, the refreshment that a slice of cantaloupe brings to my senses, learning in the garden with my dear friend Peter, time spent in my garden reflecting on the growth I am seeing inside and outside of me, and so much more.

I am shifting my attitude about my life. I am making room for more pleasure. In previous posts I have mentioned that I am only choosing to do things that feed me. Paying attention to pleasure and allowing it in my life is what is feeding me right now. What is feeding you? 

 

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Bring on Summer!

By June 22, 2014 coffee, Durham, feeding ourselves, nurturing, sandwiches, simplicity, summer veggies

Here’s a photo recap on my week leading into the beginning of summer. My sense of wonderment is overflowing right now. These pictures capture what would take me more hundreds of words than anyone may have the time to read in one sitting. I will break it all down. I will share my love of summer in recipes like mint iced tea, fresh tomato juice, chilled cucumber soup, peach and blackberry crisp, and vanilla bean ice cream. Anything else you’re particularly interested in hearing about?

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I  L – O – V – E  zinnias!

 

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Cucumber Puree with Fresh Dill for Cucumber and Buttermilk Soup

 

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Enjoying a beautiful evening in Durham with my dear friend Peter at Alley 26.

 

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First peaches, won’t be the last!

 

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Sungold tomatoes

 

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Friday night burgers – grass-fed beef and gruyere

 

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Summer = iced coffee! My first Japanese method home brew

 

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Cold beer for stocking the fridge.

 

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Summer love => BLT

Stay tuned for lots more summer food and FUN!

Lesson: My cup has been overflowing with so much appreciation for what this summer season is bringing- at the dinner table and in my life. I am moving into a new way of how I want to live my life. Without defining it, it feels exhilarating from the inside out. If you see or sense some extra exuberance, you’ll know why! I feel like I am opening up and blossoming like those zinnias I posted. Getting to this place has taken consistent focus and intention. I have been planting these seeds for as long as my feet have been on this planet. The importance of self is a life-long journey for me. If you’re wondering how I got here or where I plan on going, feel free to ask!

Where are you going? What seeds that you have planted are beginning to bloom? What seeds are you wanting to plant for the future? I would love to hear about your journey! Thanks for being here and your interest in mine!

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What Feeds Me

By May 26, 2014 creativity, feeding ourselves, getting out of our comfort zone, nurturing, practice, self care

There are many things that I could share with you that express all of the ways that I am expanding my comfort zone these days. To give you an idea, I have started a new job that challenges, inspires, and stretches me every single day. Every day is an adventure. I am loving it! Upon taking this new job, I made a promise to myself. From this point forward, I am only going to put my energy into things that feed me. What exactly do I mean by this?

I was pondering “what that means” the other night while preparing kale salad for myself and a friend who was joining me for dinner. I prepared one of my favorite salads for us – kale with avocado and lemon dressing with chiles. I also made tuna salad to go with it with lots of capers, spring onions, and very good mustard. One might say that I fed us well. We ate nutritious greens, which some call superfood. We had lean protein, which feeds muscles for people with active lifestyles. We had avocado, which is full of healthy fat. One might say that what we ate was good for us.

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Feeding ourselves runs so much deeper than what we are eating at the dinner table. This weekend, I have fed myself by crossing some meaningful plans off of my to-do list. One of those plans was riding my bike from my house to the American Tobacco Trail here in Durham (by myself). I am new to riding a bike in and around downtown. When I got my bike, it had been over 15 years since I had ridden one. I have been working on building up my endurance for longer rides and varied inclines. That old saying, “it’s like riding a bike,” doesn’t negate the need for practice to be better at your endeavor.

I have a running list of plans for myself of activities that will feed me. For those of you who read last weeks post about my adventures in relaxing, the list includes continuing to prop up my feet once in awhile. I propped my feet up for over an hour this last week, which surpassed my goal. Other plans for feeding myself include completing a new gardening project that I have just begun. I want to create a space in my yard for growing veggies and flowers. I will keep you posted on the progress of that project. That one will be feeding me literally and beyond!

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I love to dance and sing, so stay tuned for some invites for joining me at some local events. I have been wanting to check out the Contra dancing scene here for far too long!

Lesson: It is easy to take for granted that eating well and exercise are the most important ways for us to care for ourselves. The most important way that I take care of myself right now is committing to only putting my energy into what feeds me. I am still discovering and unfolding what that means. I know that when I do something that is feeding me, I feel deeply cared for and nourished on many levels. The beauty of this is that it’s this is achieved by something that I do for myself. I could not achieve the same result otherwise.  

How about you? What feeds you? What meaningful plans have you been crossing off of your list? 

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Adventures in Relaxing

By May 19, 2014 creativity, getting out of our comfort zone, nurturing, self care, slowing down

Greetings from home! I am back in Durham, North Carolina. It has been an incredibly gorgeous day today! My neighbor says that she is “bottling up” days like today and saving them for the hotter months to come. I will be sure to invite you to the party when she opens up the 70 degree bottles of sunshine, blue skies, and cools breezes.

I am refreshed and feel some renewal within, thanks to my weekend getaway. I spent 3 nights in the mountains with the goal of relaxing. I did well! I succeeded with my goal. I made only 2 trips out of the house. One excursion was to check out a couple of local art galleries, the other was to the farmers market in Boone. Both trips fed my creative nature and appreciation for expression.

In the picture below, you will see one of my favorite spots of the weekend. From the kitchen stool, I had a beautiful view of the mountains outside a sliding glass door. I ate there. I drank there. I read there. I pondered life sitting on that red stool enjoying fine coffee, farm eggs, and fresh strawberries that a farmer named Tom hand selected for me.

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This was my post-farmers market breakfast. This was a lovely sourdough pecan sticky bun from Owl Creek Breadworks. If you’re in the Boone area, I highly suggest their bagels and sticky buns. All of their breads appeared to be thoughtfully prepared.

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It was rather chilly in the mountains. I built my first fire in the fireplace. Thanks to youtube.com, I had several teachers in multiple videos that I watched. As you can see, my fire was successful. It created warmth and comfort, too!

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I must admit that this is my favorite position that I took the entire weekend. I don’t allow myself to prop my feet up as much I would like to.

Seems like a worthy new goal -propping up my feet for at least an hour a week.

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So what is the point of me sharing my weekend expereince with you? I cannot emphasize enough how important it is for us to take care of ourselves. It can be a challenge for many people to slow down. I don’t know many people that grew up learning the importance of self and what it means to take care of ourselves. I am not talking about eating a balanced diet and getting enough exercise.

I am talking about nurturing ourselves with things that we love and enjoy. I am talking about giving ourselves permission to be at the top of our own priority lists. I am talking about giving ourselves the space to process changes and transitions in our lives. I am talking about creating a space for us to acknowledge and be present to our emotions. I understand that learning how to do this is indeed a process. What can you do to begin to plant the seeds to take care of yourself in a new way?

Lesson: I became fully aware over the weekend that I don’t allow myself to prop my feet up once in a while. My feet carry and take me all over the place. I have worked for over 20 years standing on my feet for 8 or more hours a day. I am claiming a gift for me and for my feet! One hour or more a week there will be “feet propping up.” How about you? What is something that you haven’t allowed yourself to do for you? What are you going to do to change it? 

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